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Stanford announces 2021 Cuthbertson, Dinkelspiel and Gores awards

Jun 1 2021

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In the News, Students

Stanford has announced the winners of the 2021 Cuthbertson, Dinkelspiel and Gores awards honoring faculty, students and staff. The winners will be publicly recognized on June 13, during the Commencement ceremony for the Senior Class of 2021.

BY KATHLEEN J. SULLIVAN

Stanford has announced the winners of the 2021 university awards honoring faculty, students and staff for exceptional service, distinctive contributions to undergraduate education and excellence in teaching.

Last week, President Marc Tessier-Lavigne personally congratulated each of the nine winners during phone or video calls.

The nine winners will be publicly recognized on June 13 at the Commencement Ceremony for the Senior Class of 2021. The in-person ceremony, which will be livestreamed, will take place at 9:30 a.m. (PDT) in Stanford Stadium.

Stanford remains committed to holding a future in-person 2020 graduation ceremony, which will publicly recognize the 2020 winners of the Cuthbertson, Dinkelspiel and Gores awards announced in March 2021. The ceremony was delayed due to the pandemic.

Walter J. Gores Award for Excellence in Teaching

The Walter J. Gores Award recognizes undergraduate and graduate teaching excellence. This year’s winners are Justin Du Bois, Guosong Hong and Emily Schell.

Emily Schell, a doctoral candidate in developmental psychological sciences in the Graduate School of Education, and a minor in psychology in the School of Humanities and Sciences, was honored “for her thoughtful dedication to her students, often curating educational and personal support systems to fit individual needs.”

Schell was commended “for deploying innovative strategies to create an environment that encourages questions, uplifts responses and offers additional resources and office hours for her students.”

She was also honored “for her contagious passion for service learning, which inspires students to connect their academic learning with real-world problems that need solutions.”

Schell was also commended “for her effective collaborations with other graduate students and faculty in adopting new technologies and student-centered pedagogy.”